There is a tiny Twitter tempest going on right now regarding an article on The Atlantictoday by freelancer Dave Eagle, about finding out his 9-year-old son was viewing pornography. The anger is over whether Eagle’s son is too young to decide if he wanted his real name to be used, and how this article, which will likely live in perpetuity on the web, will affect him in the future. Did this article violate his son’s right to privacy?

There is a tiny Twitter tempest going on right now regarding an article on The Atlantictoday by freelancer Dave Eagle, about finding out his 9-year-old son was viewing pornography. The anger is over whether Eagle’s son is too young to decide if he wanted his real name to be used, and how this article, which will likely live in perpetuity on the web, will affect him in the future. Did this article violate his son’s right to privacy?


Steve Terrill is a journalist who works in Rwanda. Or at least he worked in Rwanda, until he accidentally got the office of Rwanda’s president Paul Kagame to implicate itself in a long-running online harassment campaign. On the latest episode of TLDR, Alex talks to Steve about inadvertently exposing the Rwandan government’s most prolific troll, and being banned from the country as a result.

Steve Terrill is a journalist who works in Rwanda. Or at least he worked in Rwanda, until he accidentally got the office of Rwanda’s president Paul Kagame to implicate itself in a long-running online harassment campaign. On the latest episode of TLDR, Alex talks to Steve about inadvertently exposing the Rwandan government’s most prolific troll, and being banned from the country as a result.

WHAT CAN WE LEARN ABOUT THE INTERNET FROM THE DISASTROUS DASHCON CONVENTION LAST WEEKEND?
Fandom works precisely because it has no leaders. People feed off one another’s creativity and energy, and you don’t need anyone’s permission to squirrel your own stories away on your Tumblr. They are yours and they are everyone’s. No one’s asking permission, no one’s organizing them beyond a few hashtags, and no one is “responsible” with keeping the fandom running smoothly. 
But to create an event, one that exists in the world, and requires transactions (both socially and monetarily), well, fandom doesn’t necessarily equip one to be able to pull that off. It feels like the DashCon organizers were faced with an event that they willed into being, and then required maintenance, follow-through, and organization. And it fell apart.

WHAT CAN WE LEARN ABOUT THE INTERNET FROM THE DISASTROUS DASHCON CONVENTION LAST WEEKEND?

Fandom works precisely because it has no leaders. People feed off one another’s creativity and energy, and you don’t need anyone’s permission to squirrel your own stories away on your Tumblr. They are yours and they are everyone’s. No one’s asking permission, no one’s organizing them beyond a few hashtags, and no one is “responsible” with keeping the fandom running smoothly. 

But to create an event, one that exists in the world, and requires transactions (both socially and monetarily), well, fandom doesn’t necessarily equip one to be able to pull that off. It feels like the DashCon organizers were faced with an event that they willed into being, and then required maintenance, follow-through, and organization. And it fell apart.