Matthew Inman (AKA The OATMEAL) On His Eisner Award Nomination
“Normally with The Oatmeal comics, it’s just funny. It’s funny and it’s clever, but there’s not usually much more than that.” Inman said that in the wake of the now infamous debate with Buzzfeed, “I had this thought that, let’s write a comic that I’ve never written before. Let’s forget everything I’ve ever done, and let’s write something that’s story driven, something that’s not very Oatmeal, and something that’s not even drawn like The Oatmeal.”

Matthew Inman (AKA The OATMEAL) On His Eisner Award Nomination

“Normally with The Oatmeal comics, it’s just funny. It’s funny and it’s clever, but there’s not usually much more than that.” Inman said that in the wake of the now infamous debate with Buzzfeed, “I had this thought that, let’s write a comic that I’ve never written before. Let’s forget everything I’ve ever done, and let’s write something that’s story driven, something that’s not very Oatmeal, and something that’s not even drawn like The Oatmeal.”

YOU CAN BE CRITICAL OF ART ON THE INTERNET WITHOUT BEING A MISOGYNIST JERK

Last week, PJ and I wrote an article in response to a failed interview between Boston Magazine writer Eugenia Williams and former child star-turned Velvet Underground parodist Macauley Culkin. I read the article as fairly mean spirited, viciously personal, and not particularly illuminating of its subject. But in writing the article about it, I strove to keep my critique measured and specific. The larger internet picked up on the story, and didn’t make a similar effort.

And then, of course, came the tired, disappointing, and wholly expected gendered attacks on the author.