Matthew Inman (AKA The OATMEAL) On His Eisner Award Nomination
“Normally with The Oatmeal comics, it’s just funny. It’s funny and it’s clever, but there’s not usually much more than that.” Inman said that in the wake of the now infamous debate with Buzzfeed, “I had this thought that, let’s write a comic that I’ve never written before. Let’s forget everything I’ve ever done, and let’s write something that’s story driven, something that’s not very Oatmeal, and something that’s not even drawn like The Oatmeal.”

Matthew Inman (AKA The OATMEAL) On His Eisner Award Nomination

“Normally with The Oatmeal comics, it’s just funny. It’s funny and it’s clever, but there’s not usually much more than that.” Inman said that in the wake of the now infamous debate with Buzzfeed, “I had this thought that, let’s write a comic that I’ve never written before. Let’s forget everything I’ve ever done, and let’s write something that’s story driven, something that’s not very Oatmeal, and something that’s not even drawn like The Oatmeal.”

YOU CAN BE CRITICAL OF ART ON THE INTERNET WITHOUT BEING A MISOGYNIST JERK

Last week, PJ and I wrote an article in response to a failed interview between Boston Magazine writer Eugenia Williams and former child star-turned Velvet Underground parodist Macauley Culkin. I read the article as fairly mean spirited, viciously personal, and not particularly illuminating of its subject. But in writing the article about it, I strove to keep my critique measured and specific. The larger internet picked up on the story, and didn’t make a similar effort.

And then, of course, came the tired, disappointing, and wholly expected gendered attacks on the author.

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THE STORY OF THE MEAN JAR as told by Alex Goldman of TLDR

There is a pretty regular volley of abuse between me and PJ. He makes fun of me for being a milquetoast suburbanite with a terrible sense of social cues, and I make fun of him for being an immature, disorganized mess with terrible taste in music.

The whole thing was getting a little exhausting, so I came up with an idea – The Mean Jar.

The way it worked was every time one of us was unnecessarily mean (and that means overtly abusive, wryly sarcastic, even in drawn form, which happens more than you’d think) the mean one would have to put 50 cents in The Mean Jar.

Our colleague Chris Neary would be the meanness referee, which was a benevolent act, seeing as we often contested his rulings.Once we reached 20 bucks, we were going to go out to lunch with our Mean Jar earnings.

Unfortunately, it was really only effective for about a week. PJ quickly began to see it as an excuse or even a provocation to be mean, dropping a dollar in to belt out a couple of epithets here and there. It wasn’t long before The Mean Jar experiment ended unceremoniously.

TLDR is a podcast from On The Media produced by Alex Goldman and PJ Vogt.

Imagine that you’re a surgeon. And day in and day out you operate on people. You save lives and you do good works, and one day something goes wrong in the operating room and a patient dies. even if it’s not your fault - keep in mind this bug was not coded by anyone on the OpenSSL team - you’re still going to feel terrible that it happened.